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SAINT MONICA

Posted on Aug 27 , 2013 in Saint of the Week

SAINT MONICA

 

SAINT MONICA: Widow; born of Christian parents at Tagaste, North Africa, in 333; died at Ostia, near Rome, in 387; Feast Day August 27.

We are told but little of her childhood. She was married early in life to Patritius who held an official position in Tagaste. He was a pagan, though like so many at that period, his religion was no more than a name; his temper was violent and he appears to have been of dissolute habits. Consequently Monica's married life was far from being a happy one, more especially as Patritius's mother seems to have been of a like disposition with himself. There was of course a gulf between husband and wife; her alms deeds and her habits of prayer annoyed him, but it is said that he always held her in a sort of reverence. Monica was not the only matron of Tagaste whose married life was unhappy, but, by her sweetness and patience, she was able to exercise a veritable apostolate amongst the wives and mothers of her native town; they knew that she suffered as they did, and her words and example had a proportionate effect.

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Santa Rosa de Lima

Posted on Aug 20 , 2013 in Saint of the Week

Santa Rosa de Lima

 

Santa Rosa de Lima, the patroness of Lima, Peru, the Americas and the Philippines, was born on the 20th of April 1586 at the hospital 'Espiritu Santo' in Lima. Her parents Gaspar Flores, a Spaniard and María de Oliva, of Indian descent had thirteen children and were very poor. Santa Rosa received her baptism under the name of Isabel Flores de Oliva in the parish of 'San Sebastian' in Lima. Although baptized Isabel, her mother called her 'Rosa' since her childhood, because of her looks and the color of her cheeks.

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Saint Hyacinth

Posted on Aug 13 , 2013 in Saint of the Week

Saint Hyacinth

 

Saint Hyacinth was born in 1185. He was born into nobility as his father was of the noble family of Odrowacz. His birth took place in the castle of Lanka at Karim, which is in Silesia. Almost from the cradle, Hyacinth seemed predisposed to virtue. God also blessed him with, a splendid mind. His parents not only fostered his happy disposition, but also used great care in selecting the teachers that would protect this innocence. In this way, he was so well grounded in his religious duties that he passed through his higher studies at Cracow, Prague, and Bologna, without tarnish to his pure soul. Upon completion of his studies at Bologna, Saint Hyacinth earned the title of Doctor of Canon Law and Divinity. Doubtless his model life had much to do in helping him to win the admiration of both his professors and fellowstudents.

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DOMINIC GUZMAN

Posted on Aug 06 , 2013 in Saint of the Week

DOMINIC GUZMAN

 

DOMINIC GUZMAN. Son of Felix Guzman and Bl. Joan of Aza, he was born at Calaruega, Spain, studied at the University at Palencia, was probably ordained there while pursuing his studies and was appointed canon at Osma in 1199. There he became prior superior of the chapter, which was noted for its strict adherence to the rule of St. Benedict. In 1203 he accompanied Bishop Diego de Avezedo of Osma to Languedoc where Dominic preached against the Albigensians (heresy) and helped reform the Cistercians. Dominic founded an institute for women at Prouille in Albigensian territory in 1206 and attached several preaching friars to it. When papal legate Peter of Castelnan was murdered by the Albigensians in 1208, Pope Innocent III launched a crusade against them headed by Count Simon IV of Montfort which was to continue for the next seven years. Dominic followed the army and preached to the heretics but with no great success. In 1214 Simon gave him a castle at Casseneuil and Dominic with six followers founded an order devoted to the conversion of the Albigensians; the order was canonically approved by the bishop of Toulouse the following year. He failed to gain approval for his order of preachers at the fourth General Council of the Lateran in 1215 but received Pope Honorius III's approval in the following year, and the Order of Preachers (the Dominicans) was founded.

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Iñigo Lopez de Loyola

Posted on Jul 30 , 2013 in Saint of the Week

Iñigo Lopez de Loyola

 

Iñigo Lopez de Loyola, who later took the name Ignatius, was the youngest son of a nobleman of the mountainous Basque region of northern Spain. Trained in the courtly manner of the time of King Ferdinand, he dreamed of the glories of knighthood and wore his sword and breastplate with a proud arrogance.

When Ignatius was born in 1491, the Middle Ages were just ending and Europe was entering into the Renaissance. So Ignatius was a man on the edge of two worlds.  Europe of the late 15th Century was a world of discovery and invention. European explorers sailed west to the Americas and south to Africa, and scholars uncovered the buried civilizations of Greece and Rome. The printing press fed a new hunger for knowledge among a growing middle class. It was the end of chivalry and the rise of a new humanism. It was a time of radical change, social upheaval, and war.