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Why are families irreplaceable?

Posted on Sep 13 , 2013 in Catechism

Why are families irreplaceable?

 

The Fourth Commandment: Honor your father and your mother.

Every child is descended from one father and one mother and longs for the warmth and safety of a family so that he may grow up secure and happy.

The family is the basic cell of human society. The values and principles that are lived out in the small circle of the family are what make solidarity in the life of larger society possible in the first place.  

Why should the State protect and promote families?

The welfare and future of a State depend on the ability of the smallest unit within it, the family, to live and develop.

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To whom does the Fourth Commandment refer, and what does it require of us?

Posted on Sep 06 , 2013 in Catechism

To whom does the Fourth Commandment refer, and what does it require of us?

 

The Fourth Commandment: Honor your father and your mother.

The Fourth Commandment refers in the first place to one’s physical parents, but also to the people to whom we owe our life, our well-being, our security, and our faith.

What we owe in the first place to our parents—namely love, gratitude, and respect—should also govern our relations to people who guide us and are there for us. There are many people who represent for us a God-given, natural, and good authority: foster or step-parents, older relatives and ancestors, educators, teachers, employers, superiors. In the spirit of the Fourth Commandment we should do them justice. In the broadest sense, this commandment applies even to our duties as citizens to the State.

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Why do Jews celebrate the Sabbath?

Posted on Aug 23 , 2013 in Catechism

Why do Jews celebrate the Sabbath?

 

The Third Commandment: Remember to Keep Holy the Lord's Day.

The sabbath is for the people of Israel the great sign commemorating God, the Creator and Redeemer.

The sabbath recalls in the first place the seventh day of creation, when God “rested, and was refreshed” (Ex 31:17), this, so to speak, authorizes all men to interrupt their work and replenish their energies. Even slaves were supposed to be allowed to observe the Sabbath. This recalls the second great commemorative sign, the liberation of Israel from slavery in Egypt: “You shall remember that you [yourself] were a servant in the land of Egypt … ” (Dt 5:15). The Sabbath is therefore a feast of human freedom; on the Sabbath all breathe freely; on it the division of the world into masters and slaves is abolished. In traditional Judaism this day of freedom and rest is also a sort of foretaste of the world to come.

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What is the meaning of the Sign of the Cross?

Posted on Aug 16 , 2013 in Catechism

What is the meaning of the Sign of the Cross?

What is the meaning of the Sign of the Cross?

Through the Sign of the Cross we place ourselves under the protection of the Triune God.

At the beginning of the day, at the beginning of a prayer, but also at the beginning of importan undertakings, a Christian makes the Sign of the Cross over himself and thus starts his business “in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit”. We are surrounded on all sides by the Triune God; calling upon him by name sanctifies the things we set out to do; it obtains blessings for us and strengthens us in difficulties and temptations.

The Second Commandment: You Shall Not Take the Name of the Lord Your God in Vain.

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Is atheism always a sin against the First Commandment?

Posted on Aug 09 , 2013 in Catechism

Is atheism always a sin against the First Commandment?

 

Atheism is not a sin if a person has learned nothing about God or has examined the question about God’s existence conscientiously and cannot believe.

The line between being unable to believe and being unwilling to believe is not clear. The attitude that simply dismisses faith as unimportant, without having examined it more closely, is often worse than well-considered atheism.

Why does the Old Testament forbid images of God, and why do we Christians no longer keep that commandment?

In order to protect the mystery of God and to set the people of Israel apart from the idolatrous practices of the pagans, the First Commandment said, “You shall not make for yourself a graven image” (Ex 20:4). However, since God himself acquired a human face in Jesus Christ, the prohibition against images was repealed in Christianity; in the Eastern Church, icons are even regarded as sacred.